schoolkidsvinyl

Blonde Redhead return with ‘Sit Down for Dinner,’ their first album in nine years and debut for section1. Its title a nod to the often-sacred communal ritual of sharing a meal with those you love, this immersive, meticulously crafted album appropriately serves an expression of persistent togetherness — a testament to the unique internal logic Blonde Redhead have refined over their three-decade existence. Formed in the 1993 New York indie underground, Blonde Redhead quickly found a place on Sonic Youth drummer Steve Shelley’s label, Smells Like, before releasing beloved records on Touch & Go and 4AD that traced an arc from angular indie-rock to cosmopolitan art pop. The trio might have been a quintessential ’90s band, if not for the fact that they continuously kept going, growing, never confined to any era but the present. Ultimately, ‘Sit Down for Dinner’ lands as perhaps the strongest record in a 30-year catalog that’s already as illustrious as it is varied. Understated yet visceral melodies charge each song, creating a foil to lyrics about the inescapable struggles of adulthood: communication breakdown in enduring relationships, wondering which way to turn, holding onto your dreams.

Blonde Redhead return with ‘Sit Down for Dinner,’ their first album in nine years and debut for section1. Its title a nod to the often-sacred communal ritual of sharing a meal with those you love, this immersive, meticulously crafted album appropriately serves an expression of persistent togetherness — a testament to the unique internal logic Blonde Redhead have refined over their three-decade existence. Formed in the 1993 New York indie underground, Blonde Redhead quickly found a place on Sonic Youth drummer Steve Shelley’s label, Smells Like, before releasing beloved records on Touch & Go and 4AD that traced an arc from angular indie-rock to cosmopolitan art pop. The trio might have been a quintessential ’90s band, if not for the fact that they continuously kept going, growing, never confined to any era but the present. Ultimately, ‘Sit Down for Dinner’ lands as perhaps the strongest record in a 30-year catalog that’s already as illustrious as it is varied. Understated yet visceral melodies charge each song, creating a foil to lyrics about the inescapable struggles of adulthood: communication breakdown in enduring relationships, wondering which way to turn, holding onto your dreams.

720841361374

Details

Format: Vinyl
Label: SECTION 1
Rel. Date: 09/29/2023
UPC: 720841361374

Sit Down For Dinner [Limited Edition Opaque White LP]
Artist: Blonde Redhead
Format: Vinyl
New: Available $29.98
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Snowman
2. Kiss Her Kiss Her
3. Not for Me
4. Melody Experiment
5. Rest of Her Life
6. Sit Down for Dinner (Part 1)
7. Sit Down for Dinner (Part 2)
8. I Thought You Should Know
9. Before
10. If
11. Via Savona

More Info:

Blonde Redhead return with ‘Sit Down for Dinner,’ their first album in nine years and debut for section1. Its title a nod to the often-sacred communal ritual of sharing a meal with those you love, this immersive, meticulously crafted album appropriately serves an expression of persistent togetherness — a testament to the unique internal logic Blonde Redhead have refined over their three-decade existence. Formed in the 1993 New York indie underground, Blonde Redhead quickly found a place on Sonic Youth drummer Steve Shelley’s label, Smells Like, before releasing beloved records on Touch & Go and 4AD that traced an arc from angular indie-rock to cosmopolitan art pop. The trio might have been a quintessential ’90s band, if not for the fact that they continuously kept going, growing, never confined to any era but the present. Ultimately, ‘Sit Down for Dinner’ lands as perhaps the strongest record in a 30-year catalog that’s already as illustrious as it is varied. Understated yet visceral melodies charge each song, creating a foil to lyrics about the inescapable struggles of adulthood: communication breakdown in enduring relationships, wondering which way to turn, holding onto your dreams.

Reviews:

Packshot

        
back to top