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First extensive anthology of Lee Perry's early productions. Today, Lee 'Scratch' Perry is widely acknowledged by both fans and experts alike as being one of the finest talents to emerge during the golden age of Jamaican music. But his climb to the top of the musical ladder was neither easy nor swift: after working as a jack-of-all- trades for Studio One boss Clement 'Coxson' Dodd, he made his mark as a recording artist and arranger in the mid-60s before overseeing recording sessions for a number of up-and- coming record label owners. Finally, in mid-1968, he finally possessed the necessary funds and expertise to join their ranks and become a fully independent producer. Perry's innovative approach and understanding of local music trends swiftly brought him national success with a number of popular singles issued on Upset, the label he co-owned with his friends and fellow musical creatives, Lynford Anderson and Barrington Lambert. Within months, he had become a fully independent operator, releasing further best-selling 45s on his Upsetter label, with the popularity of the discs attracting the attention of London-based Trojan Records, which created a British version of his imprint early 1969. Throughout this time, Perry's output particularly found favour among Britain's skinhead music fans, and that autumn their buying power proved instrumental in propelling his production of Val Bennett & The Upsetters' irresistible dancefloor-filler 'Return Of Django' into the upper echelons of the UK pop charts. It's success not only exposed Perry's music to a global audience but also provided the income to enable him to continue his experimentation with sound that in time would culminate some of the most compelling records ever to see issue. This collection, which brings together the recordings that launched Perry's career as an independent record producer, features a fascinating mixture of styles, ranging from the soulful rhythms of rock steady to the dynamic sounds of boss reggae, with the resulting mix not only providing a compelling listening experience, but also a fascinating insight into the early musical development of one of Jamaican music's most influential, innovative and successful music makers.
First extensive anthology of Lee Perry's early productions. Today, Lee 'Scratch' Perry is widely acknowledged by both fans and experts alike as being one of the finest talents to emerge during the golden age of Jamaican music. But his climb to the top of the musical ladder was neither easy nor swift: after working as a jack-of-all- trades for Studio One boss Clement 'Coxson' Dodd, he made his mark as a recording artist and arranger in the mid-60s before overseeing recording sessions for a number of up-and- coming record label owners. Finally, in mid-1968, he finally possessed the necessary funds and expertise to join their ranks and become a fully independent producer. Perry's innovative approach and understanding of local music trends swiftly brought him national success with a number of popular singles issued on Upset, the label he co-owned with his friends and fellow musical creatives, Lynford Anderson and Barrington Lambert. Within months, he had become a fully independent operator, releasing further best-selling 45s on his Upsetter label, with the popularity of the discs attracting the attention of London-based Trojan Records, which created a British version of his imprint early 1969. Throughout this time, Perry's output particularly found favour among Britain's skinhead music fans, and that autumn their buying power proved instrumental in propelling his production of Val Bennett & The Upsetters' irresistible dancefloor-filler 'Return Of Django' into the upper echelons of the UK pop charts. It's success not only exposed Perry's music to a global audience but also provided the income to enable him to continue his experimentation with sound that in time would culminate some of the most compelling records ever to see issue. This collection, which brings together the recordings that launched Perry's career as an independent record producer, features a fascinating mixture of styles, ranging from the soulful rhythms of rock steady to the dynamic sounds of boss reggae, with the resulting mix not only providing a compelling listening experience, but also a fascinating insight into the early musical development of one of Jamaican music's most influential, innovative and successful music makers.
5013929284647
People Funny Boy: The Upsetter Singles 1968-1969 - People Funny Boy: The Upsetter Singles 1968-1969

Details

Format: CD
Label: DOCTOR BIRD
Rel. Date: 08/16/2024
UPC: 5013929284647

People Funny Boy: The Upsetter Singles 1968-1969
Artist: People Funny Boy: The Upsetter Singles 1968-1969
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Non Such (Busted Me Bet) - The Mellotones
2. Stranger On The Shore - Val Bennett
3. Evol Yenoh - Burt Walters
4. Honey Love - Burt Walters
5. People Funny Boy - Lee Perry
6. Blowing In The Wind - Burt Walters
7. Uncle Charley - The Mellotones
8. Not Taking Any Sentence - Danny ; Lee
9. Farmer's In The Den - The Bleechers 1
10. What A Botheration - The Mellotones 1
11. Tighten Up - The Inspirations 1
12. A Place In The Sun - David Isaacs 1
13. Handy Cap - The Upsetters 1
14. Uncle Desmond - The Mellotones 1
15. Mad House - Lee Perry 1
16. Keep Your Mouth Shut - Danny ; Lee 1
17. Prison Sentence - The Upsetters 1
18. Stand By Me - The Inspirations 1
19. Return Of Django - The Upsetters 2
20. Mini Dress - The Righteous Flames 2
21. Good Father - David Isaacs 2
22. I'll Be Waiting - The Inspirations 2
23. What a Situation - Slim Smith 2
24. What a Botheration - Lee Perry 2
25. Eight For Eight - The Upsetters 2
26. Django aka Bronco - Lord Comic and The Upsetters 2
27. What A Botheration (alt. take) - The Mellotones 2
28. You Crummy - Lee Perry 2
29. Dollar In The Teeth - The Upsetters 3
30. Baby Baby - Val Bennett 3
31. You Know What I Mean - The Inspirations 3
32. Beware of the Pepper - Denzil Laing 3
33. Barbara - Val Bennett 3
34. People Funny Fi True - Lee Perry 3
35. Ten To Twelve - The Upsetters 3
36. How Can I Forget - Busty Brown 3
37. Dry Up Your Tears - The Mellotones 3
38. Oh Lord - The West Indians 3
39. Come Into My Parlour - The Bleechers 4
40. What A Price - Busty Brown 4
41. No Bread ; Butter - Milton Henry 4
42. Everything For Your Fun - The Bleechers 4
43. I've Got Memories - David Isaacs 4
44. I'm Leaving - David Isaacs 4
45. I Wear My Slanders - The Gaylads 4
46. Who To Tell - Bruce Bennett 4
47. Check Him Out - The Bleechers 4
48. Pound Get A Blow - The Soul Twins 4
49. The Same Thing - The Gaylads 5
50. A Testimony - The Upsetter Pilgrims 5
51. The Same Thing You Gave To Daddy - Nora Dean 5
52. The Vampire - The Upsetters 5
53. You Know What I Mean (alt. take) - The Inspirations 5
54. Dollar In The Teeth (alt. take) - The Upsetters

More Info:

First extensive anthology of Lee Perry's early productions. Today, Lee 'Scratch' Perry is widely acknowledged by both fans and experts alike as being one of the finest talents to emerge during the golden age of Jamaican music. But his climb to the top of the musical ladder was neither easy nor swift: after working as a jack-of-all- trades for Studio One boss Clement 'Coxson' Dodd, he made his mark as a recording artist and arranger in the mid-60s before overseeing recording sessions for a number of up-and- coming record label owners. Finally, in mid-1968, he finally possessed the necessary funds and expertise to join their ranks and become a fully independent producer. Perry's innovative approach and understanding of local music trends swiftly brought him national success with a number of popular singles issued on Upset, the label he co-owned with his friends and fellow musical creatives, Lynford Anderson and Barrington Lambert. Within months, he had become a fully independent operator, releasing further best-selling 45s on his Upsetter label, with the popularity of the discs attracting the attention of London-based Trojan Records, which created a British version of his imprint early 1969. Throughout this time, Perry's output particularly found favour among Britain's skinhead music fans, and that autumn their buying power proved instrumental in propelling his production of Val Bennett & The Upsetters' irresistible dancefloor-filler 'Return Of Django' into the upper echelons of the UK pop charts. It's success not only exposed Perry's music to a global audience but also provided the income to enable him to continue his experimentation with sound that in time would culminate some of the most compelling records ever to see issue. This collection, which brings together the recordings that launched Perry's career as an independent record producer, features a fascinating mixture of styles, ranging from the soulful rhythms of rock steady to the dynamic sounds of boss reggae, with the resulting mix not only providing a compelling listening experience, but also a fascinating insight into the early musical development of one of Jamaican music's most influential, innovative and successful music makers.
        
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